Podcast feed

Ey Up is a weekly interview-based podcast in which I aim to learn more about, and hopefully something from, other artists and artful individuals.

Ey Up Rory Macbeth

Before going to art school Rory spent ten years street painting around Europe, was made an honorary gypsy and even exiled from Florence. We talk about fabricating an imaginary student on his Foundation course, being typecast as a joke artist, starting his own art fair and performing Beethoven without knowing how to play the piano.

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Ey Up George Clark

George tells me about the significance of the local video store’s foreign language shelf when growing up, how much of his travels around the world have been a means to expand that shelf, and how spending time at the Jatiwangi Art Factory is making him re-think the potential of his hometown of Marsden.

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Ey Up Andy Holden

Andy talks to me about not actually being that interesting, the awful experience of watching someone play a younger version of himself, embarrassment, self-financing public sculpture, truth humour, and not using art as an excuse to make less good versions of the things they are intending to be.

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Ey Up Nicola Dale

Nicola chats with me about her love of reading, libraries, and even knowledge itself; an artist being full of doubts, understanding not understanding conceptual art, self-flagellation being too easy, going against what’s expected of you, stubbornness, and also gives me lots of good advice on being a full-time artist.

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Ey Up Keith Harrison

Keith tells me about launching a full size Rover 75 made of clay through Cannock Chase forest, being banned from the ceramics studio on the first day of art college and still ending up studying ceramics, tripping the V&A’s electrical systems, collaborating with Napalm Death and embracing unpredictability. 

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Ey Up Sean Kaye

Whilst on a brief return from Moscow, Sean speaks with me about his own seminal experience of doing a Foundation course in Carlisle, teaching painting through not painting, having multiple collaborative practices without necessarily having an individual one, and trying to capture the Loch Ness monster for the Museum of Modern Art.

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Ey Up Amanda Burton

Amanda talks with me about her scientific approach to art making, her background in biochemistry, family ties to Dolly the sheep, building a practice from volunteering at and now working to develop the creative mental health service Inkwell Arts, trees, finally getting a British Passport, and the many complications of working with fire.

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Ey Up Liar Hydrant & Ghoul Baby

Liar Hydrant and Ghoul Baby (aka artists Hardeep Pandhal and David Steans) talk with me about their rap personas and projects, the varying ways it is part of, or feeds into their respective practices, collaboration, not performing live, and it being an enjoyable, generative and sometimes  uncomfortable thing to do.

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Ey Up Simeon Barclay

Simeon recounts his journey from growing up in Huddersfield, clubbing around the country, spending sixteen years in industry before turning to art education, coming to find his past to be a useful resource, to ending up in Tate Britain. Along the way we talk masculinity, aspiration, peer influence, and Vogue magazine.

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Ey Up Emma Bearman

Emma joins me after a busy day running a pop up Playlab to talk about the influence of her pub landlady grandmother, realising she didn’t want to pursue an “artist’s life”, being nosey, the will to create, people having fun as being a higher pursuit, and the power of slime.

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Ey Up Harold Offeh

Harold tells me about discovering that conceptual art is funny, how art could be an investigatory process, the value of a good educational experience, house parties as an approach to performativity, and for him, why success is just someone figuring out what it is he even does.

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Ey Up Mick Ward

Mick chats to me about his almost four decades working in social care, ending up as the Deputy Director of Adults and Health for Leeds City Council, as well as making Leeds United dementia friendly, commissioning a room dedicated to his mother and the Riverside Mission at the Art Hostel, and the potential for art as liberation.

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Ey Up Live with Bryony Bond

Bryony shares her background in photography, newspapers, and why it wasn’t for her, visiting galleries on her own as a teenager, curating as piggybacking, and why artists should choose their practice carefully; whilst I reflect on doing the podcast, utilising artistic license, genuineness as subversion, and trying not to worry so much.

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Ey Up Mei Lum

Mei runs the oldest store in New York’s Chinatown and tells me about her decision to take on the family business, facing the threat of gentrification (of which galleries are a big part), setting up the W.O.W Project in response, and the significance of her doing so as a young woman.

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Ey Up Chelsea Clarke

After having taken her Improv 101 course at UCB, Chelsea gives me my feedback and some extra lessons as well. She also tells me about originally intending to be a painter but instead finding improv, her approaches to teaching, how it differs to coaching, and how improv helped with her social anxiety.

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Ey Up Carolina Falkholt

Carolina speaks about growing up in “very rural” Sweden, leaving home at the age of sixteen, her early beginnings as a graffiti artist, becoming a mother, reawakening her New York alias, Swedish humour, and the story behind that particular painting on the side of a building in lower Manhattan.

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Ey Up Ken+Julia Yonetani / Raul Valverde

Ken and Julia tell me about their journey into becoming an artist duo, playing John and Yoko, how living in beautiful places increases your environmental concerns, and the experience of starting a farm in rural Japan. Then I discuss with Raul our shared love of benches, the most beautiful bench in the world, his literal allergy to painting, and much more we seem to have in common.

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Ey Up David Adika

David shares with me his experience of being seen as too bohemian to continue his duty to the Israeli army, defining himself as an Arab Jew, being Mizrahi in a mainly Ashkenazi high school, his early sense of taste, his love of art, of teaching art, and the value of being generous.

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Ey Up Knut Åsdam

Knut talks to me about touring a video work around in a lorry, the usefulness of ambivalence, his most recent film made on either side of the Norwegian / Russian border, filming in military zones, and trying to establish new possibilities for people to be able to make artist produced films.

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